The hidden bonus feature of the iPhone 13 Pro Max Apple “forgot” to tell us about it

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While both of this year’s iPhone 13 Pro models again feature the same cameras and photographic capabilities, the iPhone 13 Pro Max stands out with a longer battery life, as the bigger phone can hold a larger power cell. However, it looks like the larger 6.7-inch iPhone 13 Pro Max has another trick up its sleeve: It supports faster charging of higher power than any other iPhone model, capable of charging at speeds of up to 27 watts.

The faster charging speeds have been revealed in a new series of tests carried out by ChargerLAB, who found that the larger iPhone 13 model consumes 27 watts when plugged into a compatible USB-C power adapter.

This is an increase over its predecessor, the iPhone 12 Pro Max, which charged at most standard Apple 20W speeds. Technically speaking, the iPhone 12 could get slightly faster with a suitable charger, clocked at around 21-22W, but that’s a negligible difference in practical terms.

Additionally, the standard USB-C adapter sold by Apple for the iPhone 12 was only rated at 20W initially, which was already an increase over the 18W adapter that came with the iPhone 11. Pro and the iPhone 11 Pro Max in 2019.

Notably, these faster charging speeds are only available on the iPhone 13 Pro Max.

Get the charger here

ChargerLAB Recount MacRumors that the iPhone 13 Pro peaks at 23W, so it’s slightly better than last year’s iPhone 12 models, but that’s not a big enough boost to really care.

It’s also worth keeping in mind that just like fast charging at lower speeds, you won’t get the full 27 watts for the entire charge cycle.

To maintain battery health, most electronic devices that support fast charging slow down to more normal charging speeds as the battery approaches full capacity, and the iPhone is no exception.

For example, even the iPhone 8, which was the first model to support any type of fast USB-C charging, slowed down charging speeds once the battery hit 50% and then slowed down again to the last recharge from 80 to 100%. . Concretely, this meant that you could go from a dead battery to 50% in 30 minutes, but you would still wait almost an hour for a full charge.

We have seen the same type of charging curve in subsequent iPhone models, even after the 20W load increase last year. We believe the main reason Apple is increasing charging speeds is to compensate for the larger capacity batteries in the new iPhones.

In other words, 27W charging doesn’t necessarily mean that the iPhone 13 Pro Max will charge 100% faster than the iPhone 12 Pro Max, but at least you won’t have to worry about its. slower charge.

Leak test by a Twitter user and journalist Duan Rui also revealed that with a proper 30W USB-C charger, the iPhone 13 Pro Max would maintain 26W of power for about 27 minutes, which according to its charts appears to represent around the charge point of 50 %.

Subsequently, it took an additional 59 minutes to fully charge, which equals 86 minutes in total.

Tests carried out by Appleinsider revealed that the iPhone 13 Pro Max does not appear start charges to 27W once the battery reaches approximately 10% of its capacity, and drops to approximately 23 watts when it reaches 40%. The report did not specify what happens at the 50% and 80% thresholds, although we do suspect it goes down to standard 10-12W USB speeds, just like all previous iPhone models.

How to charge an iPhone 13 Pro Max at the fastest possible speeds

If you want the fastest charging speeds for your iPhone 13 Pro Max, you’ll need to make sure that you buy the right adapterbecause none of the standard wired or wireless chargers for iPhone will reach nearly 27 watts. Get Apple’s 30W Fast Charger Here.

Specifically, all iPhone 13 models charge wirelessly at the same speeds as their iPhone 12 counterparts, either 15W if using an officially certified MagSafe adapter, or 7.5W with a standard Qi wireless charger. , which includes something called MagSafe. compatible accessories.

So it’s no surprise that you should use wired charging getting the fastest speeds possible, and to be fair, that’s nothing new. However, this year, Apple’s standard 20W USB-C adapter is no longer the best you can buy if you have an iPhone 13 Pro Max and want to charge at the fastest possible speeds.

To get the full 27W charging speeds of your iPhone 13 Pro Max, you may need a USB-C power adapter that supports the USB-PD (Power Delivery) specifications at 9 volts and 3 amps (9V / 3A).

We’ve already seen that Apple’s original 29W USB-C power adapter won’t quickly charge many of its newer devices, although it’s unclear whether this applies to iPhone 13 models. .

The problem is that this original adapter gets its 29 watts of power from a now obsolete 14.5 volt 2 amp combination, which is not supported by many newer devices, such as the Magic Keyboard. Apple for the iPad Pro or even the MagSafe Duo. , which only operate at 9 volts.

These other voltages are traditionally supported on the iPhone and iPad, but we don’t yet know if that’s still the case with this year’s iPhone lineup.

To be fair, Apple discontinued this adapter in 2018, replacing it with a newer one. 30W adapter which meets the current USB-PD 9V specification, but it’s also an adapter that many Apple fans may still have in their homes or offices.

If you have a modern MacBook, you can also use one of the USB-C adapters included with these. Even the now discontinued 87W USB power adapter that came with the 15-inch MacBook Pro supports the 9V / 3A power profile, just like the current 61W and 96W adapters.

Ultimately, almost all modern USB-C power adapters should provide more than enough current if you only care about charging your iPhone overnight, and even a standard Qi-compatible 7 wireless charger, 5W can fully charge an iPhone 13 Pro Max. while you sleep.

If you’re on the go often, however, it’s understandable that you want an adapter that offers the fastest possible charging speeds, in which case the Apple 30W adapter may be worth it.



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