Photographic accessories – UK Digitala http://ukdigitala.com/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 17:07:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ukdigitala.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T121704.452-150x150.png Photographic accessories – UK Digitala http://ukdigitala.com/ 32 32 London, fashion and the importance of being … Something https://ukdigitala.com/london-fashion-and-the-importance-of-being-something/ https://ukdigitala.com/london-fashion-and-the-importance-of-being-something/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 14:32:16 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/london-fashion-and-the-importance-of-being-something/ LONDON – At first glance it looked like it was back to business at London Fashion Week. On Friday, a sprawling industrial show space was filled with PR types and security guards in helmets, lighted floor-to-ceiling screens showing social content (the venue was sponsored by TikTok), and tight rows of fashion sequins. Many were celebrating […]]]>

LONDON – At first glance it looked like it was back to business at London Fashion Week. On Friday, a sprawling industrial show space was filled with PR types and security guards in helmets, lighted floor-to-ceiling screens showing social content (the venue was sponsored by TikTok), and tight rows of fashion sequins.

Many were celebrating Nensi Dojaka, the barely there, Albanian-born London designer of little black dresses, who became the latest LVMH award winner earlier this month.

It was her first solo show and the buzz was palpable, with a sense of cautious optimism emanating from the local crowd and largely unmasked after 18 long and difficult months. After all, everyone loves the rise of bright new talent. Especially when the fashion industry still feels muted and unmoored.

As with the New York collections, there was no real international audience. The result of travel restrictions, sure, but probably also the absence of big brands like Burberry, Christopher Kane and JW Anderson from the live programming. That’s not to say that those who stayed weren’t determined to put on a show, even if it’s on their own terms.

At the Serpentine Gallery in Hyde Park, Roksanda Ilincic presented a “Women in Motion” dance recital with performers in swollen and decidedly feminine volumes in coral, chrysanthemum, peridot and merlot plunging and rotating to capture “the kinetic dynamism of change. According to the show notes. Osman Yousefzada, known for his statuesque height and recent social activism, showcased looks in a alternative silk fabric made from wood pulp from sustainable sources. And Rejina Pyo opened her show on Sunday with the athletes of the British Olympic team diving from the diving board at the London Aquatics Center.

“I have the impression that the mood around us right now is linked to a desire for freedom, and the place where I feel freest is in the water,” said Ms. Pyo, pregnant with eight months of her second child. The models took turns around the pool in her see-through shirts, swimwear and sheer mesh dresses with photographic prints and a dazzling color palette of greens, ochres and pinks.

Motherhood, new life and beginnings emerged as a theme. Molly Goddard, on maternity leave following the birth of her son, presented a more accessible take on her vision for the oversized brand. She stepped up wardrobe basics like wide-leg denim and neon-hued Aran-style knits, offered more men’s looks as well as shrunken versions of some of her giant smocked dresses, inspired by the smaller proportions of children’s clothing.

Next, Simone Rocha, who had a daughter in May, offered meditations on mother-daughter relationships amid the dark cloisters of St. Bartholomew the Great, a medieval church in the alleys of one of the oldest neighborhoods. from London. She revisited design signatures like her layered white Holy Communion dresses, pearly embellishments and vinyl biker jackets and platform boots. From rhinestone encrusted nods to nursing bras, ribbon christening shawls, coats and button-down nightgowns in prints inspired by vintage pastel sheets were also woven.

“I couldn’t help but put myself to work and be influenced by the experience,” Ms Rocha said after her show (notably the only one of the London season where mask-wearing was encouraged at the gates. ), which moved some in the audience to tears. “There have been a lot of sleepless nights. It was exhausting. But ultimately I felt so privileged to be back and to show in person and share my latest ideas. “

How, then, to nurture and encourage the next generation of designers? Names like Ms. Dojaka, whose confident and sexy designs perfectly sum up the desire many young women have to show off their bodies after months at home. Or Supriya Lele, finalist for the LVMH prize, who plays with the concepts of disclosure and concealment through asymmetrical shapes and bare skin.

British accessories house Mulberry decided to celebrate its 50th anniversary by asking members of the New Guard to reinvent some basic handbag styles while giving them the freedom to develop new ideas. After working with Priya Ahluwalia and Nicholas Daley, the brand’s current collaboration was with Richard Malone, who draped a jewel-toned exploration of Irish artisan heritage over models that roamed Renaissance treasure galleries at Victoria and Albert. Museum.

But perhaps another broader attitude change in the industry is also needed: a genuine acceptance of digital storefronts alongside physical catwalks as a way to view new fashion. It can be a complicated transition for those used to absorbing the theater and spectacle of the runway, or taking a close look at the cut and fabric. But live performances are a great financial and emotional strain on designers, a fact widely recognized even before the pandemic. If the survival of brands is a priority for the sector, habits will have to change.

Namely: Emilia Wickstead and Victoria beckham, who have both taken a digital first approach. Ms Wickstead created a video ode to French New Wave cinema, reworking versions of her bespoke dresses and partings in fruity tones and floral prints, while Ms Beckham’s professional lookbook featured trench coats and coats. with crisp cuts, matching tunics and pants that reflected her. leaning for a menswear silhouette alongside silky dresses with austere peekaboo backs.

Indeed, digital creativity was in the spotlight. The multicolored and maximalist crochet ponchos, knit knee high socks and recycled fabric ball gowns of Woolmark Award winner Matty Bovan took on (more) a psychedelic touch than usual thanks to a short retro video of the 1970s and the accompanying GIF look. delivered. And Michael Halpern produced a video featuring Royal Ballet School principal dancers in formal wear designed to come to life in motion.

“I wanted to support the London performing arts scene, the dancers who have endured so much with incredible discipline and determination,” he said backstage on set earlier this month, standing next to Colourblock column dresses with box-shaped fringe, orb -shaped balls finished with Swarovski crystals and flowing silky evening gowns. “After such uncertainty, I wanted to capture their joy that they could come back, stand and watch the wheels keep turning.”

A similar feeling makes for one of the most emotional moments of the week. As guests gathered on Sunday evening under the colonnades of the British Museum to celebrate 15 years since Erdem Moralioglu’s first fashion show, a storm rumbled above. The designer likes to take inspiration from nonconformist characters from British history; this season was the turn of poet Edith Sitwell and Ottoline Morrell, an aristocratic philanthropist. Their influence sparked embroidered florals and bold floral prints, waisted-waisted Edwardian silhouettes and hats, romantic white lace dresses and shiny men’s tuxedo suits; an ode to survival and a love letter to the idiosyncratic soul of the British capital.

“I feel so lucky to be an independent fashion brand in London and I am fully indebted to everyone who makes this possible,” Mr Moralioglu wrote in his show notes.

During the finale, a rare double rainbow broke through the clouds to cling triumphantly against the gloomy sky.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/london-fashion-and-the-importance-of-being-something/feed/ 0
Designer Bianca Saunders mixes playfulness with rigorous formal exploration https://ukdigitala.com/designer-bianca-saunders-mixes-playfulness-with-rigorous-formal-exploration/ https://ukdigitala.com/designer-bianca-saunders-mixes-playfulness-with-rigorous-formal-exploration/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 12:59:33 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/designer-bianca-saunders-mixes-playfulness-with-rigorous-formal-exploration/ It is a very sunny afternoon in June at the Sarabande Foundation in Dalston and Bianca Saunders shows me around his studio. Her assistants are working hard on her SS22 collection. Patterns litter his desk. Pinned to the wall are a few images of bodybuilders she’s researched for inspiration for the upcoming season. “I’m obsessed […]]]>

It is a very sunny afternoon in June at the Sarabande Foundation in Dalston and Bianca Saunders shows me around his studio. Her assistants are working hard on her SS22 collection. Patterns litter his desk. Pinned to the wall are a few images of bodybuilders she’s researched for inspiration for the upcoming season. “I’m obsessed with the way the clothes move around their muscles,” she says, pointing to their mountainous biceps. “The way their muscles themselves change the pattern of clothing.”

This fascination is indicative of Bianca’s approach to fashion. It combines play and curiosity with rigorous formal exploration and technical excellence. There is a confident and a little restless creativity running through everything she does. “I get bored easily,” she said. “Or maybe, more accurately, I like to do everything. I like to do all of these different things in the studio – cut patterns, do research, design. Fashion has always been my light. I know it makes my teeth cringe, but it was always what I wanted to do when I was younger.

Bianca grew up in Lewisham. She still lives there. Her mother is a hairdresser, her father is a plasterer, and she credits the two for encouraging her to do what makes her happy and boost her creativity. She went to Kingston to do a BA, then the Royal College of Art for her Masters, and started designing and thinking correctly about men’s fashion there. She then launched her brand, under her own name, as soon as she graduated “because it was the easiest way to have a job that didn’t feel like you had a job.”

She is one of those rare designers who seem to come to life both aesthetically and conceptually fully formed. From the start, you could tell how talented she was. There was already a world around these clothes, and characters who inhabited this world. Just look at her first two collections – her AW18 graduation collection and her debut at London Fashion Week SS19 – and you can see that almost everything she was about to say about masculinity, race and fashion was already in the process of being sketched.

Take SS19, for example. Shirts are cinched at the waist or cut a little too high; they are gathered and asymmetrical. The pants are split in the front and slightly twisted. Her silhouettes appear to have been cut to the body to mimic the way clothes are actually worn. It all comes from careful, curious, studied observation. Her clothes are confident, clear, beautiful, with elegance and strength and pride in themselves. They seem to offer new ways of looking at masculinity, or offer new possibilities and ways of standing as a man, or even how you, as a man, could wear clothes that don’t match the rigidity of hegemonic masculinity. It is not only a question of softness, or of the vagueness of a binary dressing, but more of an overall attitude, a position, a pose.

P536_JBR_I-D_013_26_FNL.jpg

While studying at RCA and Kingston, the menswear scene in London was by far the most exciting and avant-garde of major fashion cities. Bianca was shaped by this scene and was inspired by designers like Jonathan Anderson and Craig Green. She cites both as influences, although you may feel their influence more than you can directly see it. Aesthetically they aren’t similar, but it’s in the way she approaches gendered clothing with freedom, and the way she turns to basic menswear clothing and finds new ways to see and wear it. wear them; it’s there in the mix of formal intricacies of tailoring with the attitude of streetwear.

“We used some really weird models in the beginning,” she explains of her process and how it evolved. “And there were mistakes too, but the mistakes led to some interesting discoveries. We adapted when the fittings were slightly offset or we modified the seams directly around the body. A lot of it comes from experimentation, from creating things that I might hate at first or revisiting things later and trying to see them in a different light. Like this jacket, ”she said, pointing to a picture from her AW21 collection. “It’s a new take on an old jacket that we made, and we took the padding out, the padding out, made it move a little bit and feel different. Or those pants, ”she said, pointing to the aforementioned pants with the slit in the middle seam. “I keep trying to get rid of the collections but people love them.”

P536_JBR_i-D_020-08_FNL.jpg

Movement is one thing at the heart of what she does. Her clothes appear to be taken in action or cheering her on. They have a clumsy grace, contorted and wriggling. You want to determine how they’re made, their angles appeal to you. Much of this comes from observing how men wear clothes or behave when wearing clothes, how they change the clothes themselves, or how their bodies behave. Two things indicative of this influence of movement and observation, which Bianca was looking at recently, were the works of Hans Eijkelboom and Erwin Wurm. With Hans Eijkelboom, it was her work An Ideal Man that she watched, a photographic series in which the artist interviewed women about their ideal boyfriends, then transformed into them – using clothes and of make-up – in a retooling of the woman / male gaze. In Erwin Wurm’s One Minute Sculptures, participants followed his instructions and created sculptures from their bodies and everyday objects, such as clothing, fruit and furniture. “I wanted it to sound a little surreal,” she says, of how these influences found their way into her work. “I wanted to tweak things that seemed familiar to people, to play with ideas of tactility.”

In a project for GucciFest, initiated and designed during the early days of the pandemic and lockdown, this mode of observation was applied to the display of clothing in a short fashion film titled The pedestrian, directed with BAFTA-nominated filmmaker Akinola Davies. The film featured the models, usually so incredibly quiet, joking and talking, describing themselves, their ideal dates, their ideal partners. It was a playful and sweet and tender take on masculinity and romance. “It was really fun doing the auditions for that,” she says, “and the show where the models were dancing too,” she says, referring to her AW20 show. “I’m really interested in breaking this fourth wall that exists in fashion. I think we have to create new ways of showing and presenting. I don’t think what I will do next will be a classic parade, it might sound a bit disappointing. “

P536_JBR_i-D_002-08_FNL.jpg

It’s been a loaded lockdown for Bianca in other ways as well. She is currently working on a few collaborations, expanding the accessory offering in her line – including a bag that is influenced by how a large file or wallet of art crumples and moves when held under the bras, due to her bulky size – and was busy in Paris with prizes and an art exhibition, where she created a sculpture with threads and clothes.

This year, she once again made the final of the LVMH Prize, the winner of which will be announced during Paris Fashion Week in September. When I interviewed her, she was about to return to Paris. She was also nominated for the ANDAM Fashion Award, one of the most prestigious. She won it a few days later, joining the other winners Martin Margiela, Anthony Vaccarello and Christophe Lemaire.

It was perhaps a little unexpected, but not undeserved. And despite the growth and accolades, you don’t feel like things are going to change too much. Bianca’s is a project that feels grounded in herself, her interests and her expertise, rather than something cynical. She simply remains an incredibly talented designer from Lewisham with a mission to observe, interpret and define the way men dress in the 2020s.

P536_JBR_I-D_009_04_FNL.jpg
P536_JBR_I-D_011_30_FNL.jpg
P536_JBR_i-D_DSC6058_FNL (1) .jpg
P536_JBR_i-D_Grid_FNL.jpg

Credits


Photography James Brodribb
Fashion Milton Dixon III

Hair Tomo Jidai at Streeters using Oribe.
Scenography Hans Maharawal at The Wall Group.
Styling assistance DeVante Rollins.
Ann Gior hair aid. Ayaka Nihei makeup aid.
Production Bonnie Osborn at Bonnie Charm Inc.
Casting director Samuel Ellis Scheinman for DMCASTING.
Casting assistance Alexandra Antonova.
Models Dwyer at Ricky Michiels, Kyle Dopgima at Next, Duot Ajang at Muse NYC, Michael Martin at DNA, Ali Ba and Benzo Perryman.
All BIANCA SAUNDERS clothing.



Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/designer-bianca-saunders-mixes-playfulness-with-rigorous-formal-exploration/feed/ 0
Enhance your portrait photography with TriFlection at the photography fair https://ukdigitala.com/enhance-your-portrait-photography-with-triflection-at-the-photography-fair/ https://ukdigitala.com/enhance-your-portrait-photography-with-triflection-at-the-photography-fair/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:04:04 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/enhance-your-portrait-photography-with-triflection-at-the-photography-fair/ If you are a portrait photographer, you know what different good lighting accessories can do. However, you don’t need a full set of expensive lights to capture a stunning portrait – the humble reflector can be a game-changer in and of itself. However, photographer and inventor Stu Williamson decided to take the reflector even further […]]]>

If you are a portrait photographer, you know what different good lighting accessories can do. However, you don’t need a full set of expensive lights to capture a stunning portrait – the humble reflector can be a game-changer in and of itself. However, photographer and inventor Stu Williamson decided to take the reflector even further with the TriFlection.

The TriFlection reflector is a step up from Williamson’s original TriFlector reflector, which featured three trapezoidal shaped reflective panels with a tilt mechanism to customize the way light reflected.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/enhance-your-portrait-photography-with-triflection-at-the-photography-fair/feed/ 0
Exeter’s coolest shopping destination with rock star fans is still a hidden gem https://ukdigitala.com/exeters-coolest-shopping-destination-with-rock-star-fans-is-still-a-hidden-gem/ https://ukdigitala.com/exeters-coolest-shopping-destination-with-rock-star-fans-is-still-a-hidden-gem/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/exeters-coolest-shopping-destination-with-rock-star-fans-is-still-a-hidden-gem/ How many local shopping destinations can say that they have world-famous rock stars among their fans – or that they are home to an iconic vintage boutique that has survived for decades? Well, that’s exactly what you’ll find if you venture into Exeter’s modest McCoys Arcade. Set back from Fore Street – well known for […]]]>

How many local shopping destinations can say that they have world-famous rock stars among their fans – or that they are home to an iconic vintage boutique that has survived for decades?

Well, that’s exactly what you’ll find if you venture into Exeter’s modest McCoys Arcade.

Set back from Fore Street – well known for its independent traders – the Arcade is also a hive of enthusiasts offering something a little different. And not a single Starbucks in sight.

Read more: Devon man mistook severe heart disease for indigestion

Some of these deals may come as a surprise because, as one merchant put it, the arcade has shifted from its once “drab” behavior to a cool, alternative place to shop.

An eclectic mix of independent businesses sits under its roof.

From hairdressers to web designers, every business is run by people who care deeply about the quality and variety of what they offer.

Known in previous years as Fore Street Center, McCoys Arcade became synonymous with its popular vintage clothing store – The Real McCoy – which ultimately led to the arcade’s original name being dropped.



James Rundle of The Real McCoy in Exeter

The boutique has been around since 1985, transporting customers back in time with vintage clothing and accessories dating as far back as the 1920s.

James Rundle, director of The Real McCoy, explained: “We cater for a variety of different needs, whether it’s conventional fashion or very specific period clothing. We try to meet all of that.”

He said he liked the “quiet atmosphere” of the arcade and added, “It’s kind of a little corner off the street.”

Another long-standing arcade business is the famous Mansons Guitar Shop.

It has earned its excellent reputation over the decades and counts Muse frontman Matt Bellamy as one of its champions.

When Matt received an advance for the band’s debut album, he came to Mansons for a custom guitar and continued to use a Manson guitar on every show and album Muse has done since.



Mansons at Exeter’s McCoys Arcade

In 2019, Matt bought Manson Guitar Works co-founder Hugh Manson, who still owns the Mansons Guitar Shop in Exeter.

“The store has been in Exeter for a very long time – I think over 30 years or so,” explained John, who works in the store.

“The owner is Hugh Manson who has worked with Led Zepplin for 25 years, and obviously we are known for the Muse Association and Matt Bellamy.

“We have a group of properly trained staff to give you the right advice whether you are just starting out or have been playing for four decades,” he said.

John said customers who choose to support arcade activities help fund people’s passions while still getting first-class service.



Outside McCoys Arcade in Exeter’s Fore Street

“The wonderful thing about the descent from Fore Street to Exeter is that the businesses are mostly independent,” he said.

“And when you walk in you talk to people like me – there’s no higher from here, you genuinely support a local business. Even though the name is big, the store isn’t.

“So that means when you come and talk to us, we are all musicians who play and love what we’ve been doing and have been doing for a long time.

“Ditto for the bookstore and The Real McCoy – they’re all independent companies doing things because they want to do them, so when you come and support them, you meet people with the same passion as you.”



Chris Harper of Hops and Handicrafts in Exeter

Chris Harper bought his love of craft beer from the arcade in 2015 when he opened Hops and Crafts.

The shop offers an ever-changing selection of over 200 different beers from around the world, including America, Belgium and Scandinavia.

“I think the best thing about being here is just the feeling of community in the sense that everyone here is doing something they’re passionate about,” Chris said.

“There’s no one coming because they have to come to work. These are people who settle down like me as something that they’re really interested in – something that they want to share with other people.”

The latest company to join McCoys Arcade is independent bookstore The Bookbag, which opened during the pandemic.

Charlie Richards of the store explained, “We wanted to sell books that maybe a little different, celebrating independent publishers.



Charlie Richards of Bookbag in McCoys Arcade, Exeter

“For example, for our children’s books, we don’t have famous authors. more difficult to find interesting books.

“Exeter has two huge bookstores, and we’re hoping to come up with something a little different.

“We can order any book if people want to buy books independently, and it usually happens very quickly.”

The store offers a wide range of unusual books, including on race, feminism, nature, music and art.

It has also hosted an online book club and hopes to start offering more face-to-face events.



Inside McCoys Arcade, Exeter

“We want to be a very sociable space,” Charlie said.

“We’re next to a cafe so people can come in, buy a book, take it to Sacred Grounds, order a coffee, and read it.

“There’s a real kind of friendship around all of the arcade businesses, and I think being the newest store here, what we do compliments what they do and what they do. font also helps us.

“You will get something different from what you do in department stores. You will get more user-friendly service.

“I think a few clients tell me they feel like the area has changed, and it’s definitely for the better,” she said.

“You can get really good coffee and really good food here – it feels like shopping in a cool place.”

Step into Francis Kay Vintage, and you’ll definitely feel like you’ve arrived in a pretty cool place.



Chris Wooddissee owner of Francis Kay Vintage in the McCoys Arcade, Exeter

The company – owned by Chris Wooddissee – buys, sells and restores vintage technology – mainly typewriters, photographic equipment and vintage HiFi systems.

“Because we do what we do, we like to think there’s a wide ‘green’ angle to that, so it’s not just about the quality of the items we sell,” he said. declared.

“What we are doing here is very sustainable and environmentally friendly.

“Francis Kay was my grandfather, and he taught me everything I know.

“It’s on Fore Street, which is sort of the coolest end of town.

“We’re full of freelancers – there aren’t any channels here at all. That’s his USP – his unique businesses.



Hairdresser McCoys Arcade Hair’em Scare’em

“Where are you going to buy a typewriter in the South West, let alone Exeter?”

“We consider ourselves to be established, but you have companies like Mansons which have been established for decades and The Real McCoy which have been established for decades. It’s a very unique place to come.

“All businesses are very complementary to each other. They all fit together quite well, so there are a variety of stores that sell second-hand or second-hand items or handmade crafts.

“Even the tearoom, they don’t just sell stuff you could buy at Sainsbury’s – the same with the beer store.

“Same with Manson’s guitar shop – same with us.

“And I think that’s another reason it really, really works. It just attracts people from all parts of the Southwest, which is fantastic.”

Those looking to take a break from the arcade arcade shopping can relax at the Sacred Grounds Cafe, which is run by the former owners of the cult boutique No Guts No Glory.

You can still find No Guts No Glory right in front of the arcade, but over the past few years Hayley Maker and the team have focused their energies on the herbal Sacred Grounds coffee.

“We love to create really innovative food – really fresh,” said Hayley.



Staff preparing meals inside Sacred Grounds at McCoys Arcade, Exeter

“We make everything from scratch here in our small kitchen.

“We also really like using local suppliers as much as possible, so for example our tea comes from the tearoom at the end of the arcade. Our coffee is from Crediton.

“We also run on green energy and try not to waste as much as possible.



Inside the sacred grounds, Exeter

“On top of that, we just want to create a really lovely community cafe where everyone is welcome, where you walk in, and where you can sit and have a wonderful brunch, and the food is always great.

“We want to put Exeter on the map for a really great place where you can come to dine and eat, bring your friends and family and be proud of the city we are in.



Inside McCoys Arcade facing Fore Street

“The arcade has always been a hotspot for alternative culture in Exeter. It has always had an artisanal atmosphere.

“And in the 10 years since we know that – because we launched No Guts, No Glory in this arcade – he’s kind of gone through this huge transformation, and he’s lost a lot of those footage of a theater. ‘dull arcade.

“It’s now so vibrant and full of light and life. It’s really unique, there aren’t many arcades like this in the world anymore, so it’s very important that it’s celebrated.”

Get the best stories about the things you love most curated by us and delivered to your inbox every day. Choose what you like here

Read more news from Devon:

Devon’s forgotten and unwanted dogs need homes

Devon pub closes for a week and takes staff on well-deserved vacation


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/exeters-coolest-shopping-destination-with-rock-star-fans-is-still-a-hidden-gem/feed/ 0
Love letter from Luca Nichetto to Murano glass – SURFACE https://ukdigitala.com/love-letter-from-luca-nichetto-to-murano-glass-surface/ https://ukdigitala.com/love-letter-from-luca-nichetto-to-murano-glass-surface/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 18:35:23 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/love-letter-from-luca-nichetto-to-murano-glass-surface/ DESIGN The prolific designer returns to his Venetian roots with a group exhibition that showcases the material’s ability to evoke memories and emotions. BY RYAN WADDOUPS September 16, 2021 “Empathic: Discovering a Glass Legacy” at the InGalleria / Punta Conterie art gallery in Venice, Italy. Photograph by Roberta Orio … “It’s part of my DNA” […]]]>

DESIGN

The prolific designer returns to his Venetian roots with a group exhibition that showcases the material’s ability to evoke memories and emotions.

BY RYAN WADDOUPS

September 16, 2021

“Empathic: Discovering a Glass Legacy” at the InGalleria / Punta Conterie art gallery in Venice, Italy. Photograph by Roberta Orio

“It’s part of my DNA” Luca Nichetto said about Murano glass. He literally means: born in Venice to a family employed by the world famous Murano glass industry, Nichetto began selling his childhood creations to local factories before honing his knowledge of industrial design at the Università Iuav. di Venezia, joining local glassmaker Salviati as an early career concert and consultant for heritage lighting company Foscarini. The launch of his own design practice soon followed, and now he creates furniture, lighting and accessories that are inflected with his Italian panache and the clean sensibilities of Stockholm, where he is currently based.

He has not lost sight of his roots, which shine through a collective exhibition he organized for the Ingalleria / Punta Conterie art gallery in Venice and which highlights his glass sensibility. “Empathetic. Discovering a Glass Legacy ”invited eight world-renowned designers, including Ini Archibong, Elena Salmistraro and GamFratesi, to create artistic pieces under the close supervision of Murano glass masters. The brief? Carte blanche, and the more experimental the better. “I wanted to see what would happen if we all got involved in experimenting,” says Alessandro Vecchiato, who produced the show alongside Nichetto and aimed to “disrupt the grammar of each other’s forms, techniques and ingenuity. to achieve unprecedented results “.

Granule by Benjamin Hubert

Laminated by Richard Hutten

Unsurprisingly, the results are stunning. Each piece pays a subtle homage to the illustrious history of Murano glassmaking while incorporating design flourishes that speak to each manufacturer’s distinct sensibilities. GamFratesi, for example, turned to the Venetian Lagoon for a small landscape made up of different shapes in large blown glass resting on sections of wood obtained from odds and ends, the traditional posts that mark the waterways. Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance also focused her gaze on the seaside, infusing a side table with dusty tones reminiscent of Lucie Jean’s photographic series “Down by the Water”, which she created on a small neighboring island called Madonna del Monte. Its rounded glass surface gently ripples like waves, a delicate technique to achieve, but carried out with extreme precision.

Other biased designs featured, speaking of the material’s unparalleled ability to evoke emotions and recall memories. Elena Salmistraro designed a monumental mirror inspired and named after Medusa and her Gorgon snakes. A centerpiece with sinuous glass edges and coils that seem to slide, she presents herself as an emblem of femininity that both enhances the beauty she reflects and petrifies those who gaze within. Ini Archibong, meanwhile, returned to his Nigerian roots with a highly detailed sculptural piece that seamlessly conveys the expressive nature of African wooden masks in chromatic glass.

Mecha by Luca Nichetto

“Empathic” took a deeply personal note for Nichetto. Although he was the curator of the show, he presents three unpublished pieces that poignantly recall childhood memories. It pays homage to the animated series of the 70s Grendizer Robot UFO-known as Goldrake in Italy, through three colorful glass robot-like creatures, sheathed in glittering, rustproof armor. “They perfectly represent the union of two elements of my childhood on the island: glass and Japanese cartoons”, Nichetto wrote on Instagram. “I couldn’t be happier to combine these two great memories.”

For Nichetto, no piece sums up the beauty of “Empathic” and its memories with Murano glass. Rather, he emphasizes how “the creation process was intended only to support Murano glass. I like to think that we too are part of the rich tradition of designers who have worked with Murano glass over the years – names like Carlo Scarpa, Ettore Sottsass, not to mention more contemporary artists like Jeff Koons. He also wants the exhibition to encourage young designers to discover the joy of Murano while, of course, spreading a certain positivity. “I hope that all the energy put into the exhibition will bring a positive message of growth and broadening of horizons for the island.

“Palafit” by GamFratesi

Jellyfish by Elena Salmistraro

Madonna del Monte by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance

Marc Thorpe’s family

Africa by Ini Archibong

“Empathic: Discovering a Glass Legacy” will be on display at the InGalleria / Punta Conterie art gallery in Venice, Italy until April 10.

All Stories
Previous Next



Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/love-letter-from-luca-nichetto-to-murano-glass-surface/feed/ 0
These easy-to-read lens labels help you quickly identify equipment https://ukdigitala.com/these-easy-to-read-lens-labels-help-you-quickly-identify-equipment/ https://ukdigitala.com/these-easy-to-read-lens-labels-help-you-quickly-identify-equipment/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:55:02 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/these-easy-to-read-lens-labels-help-you-quickly-identify-equipment/ Canada based company Field Made Co. designed a series of stylish lens caps indicator labels for Canon, Nikon, Sony, Fujifilm and Sigma lenses. “Enhance your photographic experience by organizing your gear to help you find the right lens quickly and also to make your camera bag look professional and clean,” writes Field Made. Company founders […]]]>

Canada based company Field Made Co. designed a series of stylish lens caps indicator labels for Canon, Nikon, Sony, Fujifilm and Sigma lenses.

“Enhance your photographic experience by organizing your gear to help you find the right lens quickly and also to make your camera bag look professional and clean,” writes Field Made.

Company founders Jean-François and Vivian say Field Made was born out of their love of photography and having beautiful and useful things (props) to enhance the photographic experience. They say that while working with other photographers, they noticed that many used duct tape to mark lenses, cameras, and batteries in their kits. While useful visual aids for quickly finding the right lens in a bag, aesthetically it was a shame to put simple, ugly tape on such beautiful and expensive equipment, so they decided to create a series of stylized labels as creatives would find it useful as well as visually impressive and professional.

While most professional photographers have a special way of packing their gear so they know where everything is, in the midst of a hectic shoot, even the best-organized creatives can get the wrong lens or waste time. looking for something in the dark. The purpose of these indicators is to make it easier for photographers to find the right equipment on the set. The only downside to this system is ensuring that the right lens cap comes back to the right lens every time.

Field Made has created custom indicator labels for camera lenses and bodies (both DSLR and mirrorless) from manufacturers such as Sony, Nikon, Fujifilm, Sigma, and Canon. This means that there is probably an indicator label available for most of the equipment found in any photographer’s camera bag which will make sorting and identification on the set much easier.

Camera and lens indicator labels are available in the Field Made Co official store starting at just $ 6.25 (CA $ 7.99) for an individual label, with pack sets starting at $ 24.75 (CA $ 29.99). The company also sells a variety of Lapel pins for those looking to add an extra touch to their bags, suspenders or outfits.



Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/these-easy-to-read-lens-labels-help-you-quickly-identify-equipment/feed/ 0
The girl remembers the loyal trader from Wisbech and March https://ukdigitala.com/the-girl-remembers-the-loyal-trader-from-wisbech-and-march/ https://ukdigitala.com/the-girl-remembers-the-loyal-trader-from-wisbech-and-march/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 15:16:00 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/the-girl-remembers-the-loyal-trader-from-wisbech-and-march/ Tributes were paid to a longtime trader who “always cared about what other people did”. Bridget Hammond of Wisbech ran Hammond’s Camera Shop in the city with her husband Denis for over 55 years, before retiring in 2004. Bridget’s daughter Melanie Stibbons said: “My mom supported my dad in everything he did while doing his […]]]>

Tributes were paid to a longtime trader who “always cared about what other people did”.

Bridget Hammond of Wisbech ran Hammond’s Camera Shop in the city with her husband Denis for over 55 years, before retiring in 2004.

Bridget’s daughter Melanie Stibbons said: “My mom supported my dad in everything he did while doing his fair share of work in the store.”

Bridget, who died at the age of 92 last month, has lived and worked in Wisbech her entire life.

The only child of Ken and Hilda Coates who ran the town’s old Black Horse pub, she attended St Audrey’s Convent School on Alexandra Road before working at the Wisbech Telephone Exchange.


Bridget Hammond was born in Wisbech and lived and worked in the city with her husband Denis.
– Credit: Mélanie Stibbons

Bridget married Denis, a former journalist for the Wisbech Standard newspaper, in 1948 and settled and lived above their camera store on Norwich Road, selling cameras, photographic accessories and providing service. ‘impression.

After their first store was demolished, along with other stores in the market square, Bridget also ran a gift shop and offered a framing service.

“Mom and dad have worked side by side their entire lives,” Melanie said.

“They started the business after the war and it was the camera side that took off as cameras became more popular.”

When the camera store was needed for the development of the Horsefair shopping center, Bridget, Denis and his assistant Betty Reeve moved to premises on Market Street.


Hammonds Camera Shop Market Place Wisbech

Hammonds Camera Shop on Market Place in Wisbech, one of the many premises used by the couple.
– Credit: Mélanie Stibbons

It was here that Betty took charge of the store, until her retirement in 2004 when the family business was sold.

But it wasn’t just in the cases Bridget was perhaps best known for.

“Bridget got more involved in the life of Wisbech through the clubs and societies in town such as the tennis club, women’s hockey, the bridge club, indoor balls and the Wisbech Society,” said Melanie.

“She also supported Denis in his work for the Wisbech Chamber of Commerce and the many other organizations in the city to which he belonged.”


Russel Flint print for Hammonds Camera Shop staff member 1984

Left to right: Denis Hammond, Betty Reeve and Bridget Hammond in March 1984 where Betty received a signed print to mark 25 years of service.
– Credit: Mélanie Stibbons

After Denis died in 2006, Bridget continued to live in the house they had built along Norwich Road until 2016 when she was taken into care.

“Many customers will remember Bridget’s cheerful smile and her polite and friendly way of serving them around the store,” Melanie added.

“She had a beautiful smile and was always interested in what other people were doing.”

For more details on the funeral service and to share memories of Bridget, contact Melanie on 01775 767286.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/the-girl-remembers-the-loyal-trader-from-wisbech-and-march/feed/ 0
Nikon just discontinued 2-year-old camera due to parts shortage https://ukdigitala.com/nikon-just-discontinued-2-year-old-camera-due-to-parts-shortage/ https://ukdigitala.com/nikon-just-discontinued-2-year-old-camera-due-to-parts-shortage/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 13:14:39 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/nikon-just-discontinued-2-year-old-camera-due-to-parts-shortage/ Nikon has abandoned a camera that is just over two years old, “due to an uncertain future supply of parts.” In addition, the manufacturer has suspended orders for four individual accessories due to delays in the supply of parts. The Nikon Coolpix B600 did not go on sale until February 2019, but became the latest […]]]>

Nikon has abandoned a camera that is just over two years old, “due to an uncertain future supply of parts.” In addition, the manufacturer has suspended orders for four individual accessories due to delays in the supply of parts.

The Nikon Coolpix B600 did not go on sale until February 2019, but became the latest victim of the global shortage of parts and components. However, while a number of affected products have only been delayed, the situation with the B600 – one of Nikon’s entry-level bridge cameras – is so dire that the manufacturer has withdrawn the device altogether. Photo.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/nikon-just-discontinued-2-year-old-camera-due-to-parts-shortage/feed/ 0
Fujifilm X100V camera review: retro styling, rugged design and timeless features https://ukdigitala.com/fujifilm-x100v-camera-review-retro-styling-rugged-design-and-timeless-features/ https://ukdigitala.com/fujifilm-x100v-camera-review-retro-styling-rugged-design-and-timeless-features/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 16:35:11 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/fujifilm-x100v-camera-review-retro-styling-rugged-design-and-timeless-features/ Buy now £ 1,299, Johnlewis.com Megapixels: 26MP X-trans sensor Lens: Crepe 23mm F2 Filter: LCD touchscreen rear panel Video: 4K at 30 fps Filtered: 4-stop ND filter Evaluation: 9/10 First impressions Out of the box, you’re greeted with a nice retro design that will be familiar to Fujifilm aficionados, and in appearance it looks a […]]]>

Buy now £ 1,299, Johnlewis.com

  • Megapixels: 26MP X-trans sensor
  • Lens: Crepe 23mm F2
  • Filter: LCD touchscreen rear panel
  • Video: 4K at 30 fps
  • Filtered: 4-stop ND filter
  • Evaluation: 9/10

First impressions

Out of the box, you’re greeted with a nice retro design that will be familiar to Fujifilm aficionados, and in appearance it looks a lot like previous incarnations of the X100 series. We liked that it comes with a hybrid optical / digital viewfinder, which brings the camera closer to the compact setups of yore. The black and silver option is particularly attractive and we liked the overall styling and setup.

In the hand it looks small and compact but, due to the device’s large entry-level SLR-style sensor, it doesn’t immediately feel geared towards the lightweight market. We had no trouble slipping it into our pocket for a day’s use, but if portability is your key buying criteria, you might want to take a look at your options first. A good camera bag gets around this problem and also provides additional protection for the camera.

Speaking of protection, we liked that Fujifilm protected the camera from the elements – with dust and splash protection – which is a great feature that will appeal to documentary and nature travel photographers. . It’s a bit of a shame that you have to buy an additional filter to provide the same protection to the lens, but the AR-X100 Adapter is available for around £ 40 extra. Third party parts are also available.

Objective and image quality

The 23mm lens offers a semi-wide angle, but you can purchase add-ons that provide both 28mm and 50mm optics. They are available separately and cost around £ 300 – so not cheap – but that broadens the camera’s appeal for a range of types of photographers. It’s nice and quick at F2 and, although it’s driven by new software and has been totally redesigned, it looks very familiar to the previous X100 examples. Fujifilm offers a range of small cameras with interchangeable lenses, but if you’re looking for a compact setup that takes the hassle out of you, we think this is the best thing to do.

Read more: 6 best drones for beginners: take to the skies with these entry-level models

The photo quality is good, with a central focus and excellent correction at the edges of the frame which avoids distortion. The ND filter operates at four stops, which makes it very useful for obtaining uniform light in landscapes in particular. We especially liked the sharpness of the images close to the camera – the lens will focus at just under 4 inches and display significantly better quality than previous versions. In general, there’s a crisp, vibrant, and clear approach to the images it creates without too much smoothing and with the generous size of the sensor it looks a lot like a high-end product.

Characteristics

Detection of faces and eyes in images comes standard, along with a series of features that make JPGs editable on the device itself, with software that does a great job of enhancing colors, noise reduction and accentuation of details. There are also a number of film simulations that add grain, noise, and general imperfections that we’re more used to seeing on older 35mm cameras. The tilting touchscreen works great – it’s decisive and responds very well to inputs in terms of autofocus and setting menu items. The body controls, ergonomics, and handling are impressive and have a very old-fashioned feel – the dial at the top, for example, has satisfying indents and looks a lot like cameras from a bygone era – not just in this case. , that is a bad thing.

If you like the video, you won’t be disappointed either. The camera delivers 4K at 30 frames per second, and while the device isn’t really set up as a filmmaker unit, the output is great, crisp and crisp. While the autofocus works great, there is no image stabilization so images can look quite shaky. If you really love movies, it might be worth taking your eye elsewhere.

The verdict: Fujifilm X100V compact camera

Overall, we were very impressed with the Fujifilm X100V. It’s by far the best X100 to date and the overall usability and image quality are on par with some much more expensive cameras. That being said, we also think part of its appeal comes from its retro styling and overall look – it’s a sturdy design, uses classic and timeless features that work well, and it feels like an upscale piece. and well thought out of modern technology in an ageless body.

Images have crisp, vibrant quality with warm color reproduction that echoes old 35mm cameras of yore like the Olympus Trip, but with the clarity and crispness of modern digital technology. By exploring the many editing options available in the camera itself, it is possible to achieve some very enjoyable retro-inspired looks, with decent color grading variables and grain presets that give the images in timeless quality, ready to be shared on social networks or other devices using wireless and Bluetooth connectivity.

However, it is undeniable that this is an expensive setup. There are deals available, but they tend to be over £ 1,200 which is a lot of money for a compact camera while SLR and bridge camera deals are often much cheaper. The only other camera like this is the Leica Q2 (£ 4,500, Wexphotovideo.com), which really only caters to the luxury market and therefore makes it seem like a very good option.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/fujifilm-x100v-camera-review-retro-styling-rugged-design-and-timeless-features/feed/ 0
EVALUATING EMOTIONS THROUGH HIS VISUAL STORIES, ALVIN UKPE ENCOURAGES DIALOGUE https://ukdigitala.com/evaluating-emotions-through-his-visual-stories-alvin-ukpe-encourages-dialogue/ https://ukdigitala.com/evaluating-emotions-through-his-visual-stories-alvin-ukpe-encourages-dialogue/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 01:02:53 +0000 https://ukdigitala.com/evaluating-emotions-through-his-visual-stories-alvin-ukpe-encourages-dialogue/ Demonstrating an intuitive understanding of depth of field and his creative choice of subjects, Alvin Ukpe’s photographs, shown in his recent exhibition in Lagos, shine with promise, says Okechukwu Uwaezuoke Solitude – Alvin Ukpe’s invitation to local connoisseurs to explore the streams of consciousness bubbling beneath his still images – smacks of the most admirable […]]]>

Demonstrating an intuitive understanding of depth of field and his creative choice of subjects, Alvin Ukpe’s photographs, shown in his recent exhibition in Lagos, shine with promise, says Okechukwu Uwaezuoke

Solitude – Alvin Ukpe’s invitation to local connoisseurs to explore the streams of consciousness bubbling beneath his still images – smacks of the most admirable type of heroism. In a way, this hitherto unknown photographer needed this grand entry into a vibrant exhibition circuit. Therefore, the recent two-day solo outing at the South Eatery and Social House along Younis Bashorun Street on Victoria Island, Lagos seemed designed to achieve its goal of entering the Lagos photography scene.

On the inspiration for the exhibition, which opened on Saturday August 14 and ended Sunday August 15, the Nigerian-American photographer hinted that it came from the state of his subconscious at that time. of his life. The pandemic-induced closures had just been eased and he had embarked on what he called “a travel photography trip.” For him, the trip was not only an opportunity to escape the depressing mood that followed lockdown, he also needed to be alone with his thoughts and find time to explore. “I found out that I was subconsciously filming the ‘Loneliness’ theme when I got home and looked at my recent shots,” he recalls. “The pictures spoke to me and I decided to put together a collection and use it to inspire the world.”

Trust this alchemical curatorial trick to divide the exhibit into two main, cohesive segments. Perhaps this is why one of the segments, which seemed central to the theme, only featured works done in monochrome, while the other segment featured a collection of color photographs.

Yet there was something premeditated about the works – all produced in 2021 – that belies the photographer’s claim that they are “an organic collection of serenity, sadness, tranquility, loneliness, peace and pain. ; all the emotions we tend to feel when we are alone, isolated, reclusive or introverted, basically when we are in a state of loneliness.

What could have been hiding in the mind of the bushy-haired 26-year-old when he photographed a lonely woman enjoying the crisp, wintry morning air in the park? “She says coming here so early gives her time to reflect and get back in shape for the day,” he wrote in the explanatory note to the photograph, titled “Early Bird,” adding with all the puns: “We are both ahead of the birds; in this case, I am the bird and this image is my worm.

Perhaps the feeling of loneliness is more evident in the photograph titled “Me Day”, in which a man is lying on an armchair in what appears to be a beach. It must be a beach because part of the photographer’s explanation corroborates it: “He’s at peace watching the sunset and listening to the ocean waves as they hit the shore. If this photograph is not the result of Photoshop manipulation, the subject succinctly lends itself to the title of the exhibition.

Ukpe, who also goes by the professional nickname NYV (an anagrammatized DIY of his first name Alvin), tells compelling stories through his lens. He says his penchant for natural and minimalist expressions is intentional and aims to “reveal originality and a connection between his audience and the subject of each image.” And speaking of this connection, he adds that it “evokes emotions which arouse a dialogue in oneself”.

But the chances that the clean content of his photographs may have offered more incentive for disjointed viewing cannot be discounted. And, indeed, there isn’t much about monochrome photographs like “Forlorn”, “Self-Reflection”, “My Corner”, “Unaccompanied”, “Sick of All This Noise”, “Social Distancing” and “Fear of Falling”, to stick around them. This is even when they can be recognized as very engaging in their sublime simplicity.

Nonetheless, West Virginia University, a United States agribusiness and rural development graduate, urges the public to “look at every picture with an open mind,” as this would allow their “consciousness to float through the loneliness of [his] expressions. “

As a largely self-taught photographer, who only recently – as recently as 2018 – entered the Lagos photography scene, he should be more circumspect in making judgments on a scene that has not only produced regulars. of the Bamako Photography Biennale, but also given the LagosPhoto Festival a reason to exist. He bases, for example, his impressions of the Lagos photography scene on mistaken assumptions that his colleagues focused primarily on portrait shots. “I quickly expanded my content beyond portraits, to cover other salient areas including landscape photography, concept photography, product shots, photojournalism, street photography and much more. . “

But none of the above gave his exhibition its unmistakable quality. Rather, the halo of promise that shines around his works can be attributed to his intuitive understanding of depth of field and his creative choice of subjects. Clearly, he was past those years when his father’s passion for photography fueled the glowing embers of his interest in photography.

His father, he recalls, bought the latest cameras and photographic accessories, which he ultimately never used. “Out of curiosity I started using them to take pictures of anything and found out that I was good and that I had an eye for it. I decided to make it a hobby until about two years ago, when I was offered a good price for my photos and the rest is history.

And speaking of “history,” there has so far been nothing more historic in his career than his resignation in June of this year from his job in the oil and gas industry to devote himself to his passion for full-time photography.


Source link

]]>
https://ukdigitala.com/evaluating-emotions-through-his-visual-stories-alvin-ukpe-encourages-dialogue/feed/ 0